Posted by: Patricia Hysong | October 12, 2014

Travel Prepared!

Travel in the best of circumstances can be dangerous but add winter weather into the mix and it can be downright treacherous. Here are a few tips to help you prepare for winter travel.

Check or have a mechanic check the following items on your car:

  • Antifreeze levels – ensure they are sufficient to avoid freezing.
  • Battery and ignition system – should be in top condition and battery terminals should be clean.
  • Brakes – check for wear and fluid levels.
  • Exhaust system – check for leaks and crimped pipes and repair or replace as necessary. Carbon monoxide is deadly and usually gives no warning.
  • Fuel and air filters – replace and keep water out of the system by using additives and maintaining a full tank of gas. A full tank will keep the fuel line from freezing.
  • Heater and defroster – ensure they work properly.
  • Lights and flashing hazard lights – check for serviceability.
  • Oil – check for level and weight. Heavier oils congeal more at low temperatures and do not lubricate as well.
  • Thermostat – ensure it works properly.
  • Windshield wiper equipment – repair any problems and maintain proper washer fluid level.
  • Install good winter tires – Make sure the tires have adequate tread. All-weather radials are usually adequate for most winter conditions. However, some jurisdictions require that to drive on their roads, vehicles must be equipped with chains or snow tires with studs.

Update the emergency kit in your vehicles with:

  • a shovel
  • windshield scraper and small broom
  • flashlight
  • battery powered radio
  • extra batteries
  • water
  • snack food
  • matches
  • extra hats, socks and mittens
  • first aid kit with pocket knife
  • necessary medications
  • blanket(s)
  • tow chain or rope
  • road salt and sand
  • booster cables
  • emergency flares
  • fluorescent distress flag

Information obtained and adapted from the following source: http://www.ready.gov/

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | October 5, 2014

Be Prepared Before the Storm Hits

With the news of an upcoming storm in our area, I found myself outside putting the last remnants of summer away (the bike, the remaining potting soil, the lawn equipment) and bringing out the necessary equipment for removing the piles of snow we were predicted to get. It turned out to be barely a dusting but the temperature dipped down to a mere 20°F. Burr!

The National Weather Service refers to winter storms as the “Deceptive Killers” because most deaths are indirectly related to the storm. Instead, people die in traffic accidents on icy roads and of hypothermia from prolonged exposure to cold. It is important to be prepared for winter weather before it strikes.

To prepare for winter storms, here are a few basic things you should do:

Add the following to your existing emergency kit

  • Rock salt or other products to melt ice on walkways
  • Sand to improve traction
  • Snow shovel and other snow removal equipment
  • An alternative heat source in case your normal source\service is interrupted
  • Adequate clothing and blankets for warmth

Make a Family Comminication Plan so everyone knows what to do and how to contact each other in case you are not all together when an emergency situation happens.

Make sure you have a way of receiving weather and news updates if power is limited or out. Get a battery operated weather radio, sign up to receive notices from your local emergency services, and\or get one of the many free apps for you phone from places like FEMA or the American Red Cross that will give you information on shelters, first aid and getting assistance.

Don’t travel unless absolutely necessary and if you must, make sure your vehicle is equipped to handle the weather you may be facing and is stocked with an emergency kit.

Make sure your pets and other animals are protected from the elements by moving them to or providing shelter in a weather protected area with access to non-frozen drinking water.

Information obtained and adapted from the following source: http://www.ready.gov/

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

 

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | September 28, 2014

Kidney Friendly “Superfoods”

Although there is no scientific definition of the term “superfood,” it is generally considered to be a food that has an unusually high amount of antioxidants, vitamins or other nutrients.

Here are 7 foods that, according to the National Kidney Foundation, pack a nutritional punch for overall good health.

1. Apples

Apples

2. Blueberries

Blueberries

3. Fish High in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

40058757.tif

4. Kale

SONY DSC

5. Strawberries

Strawberries

6. Spinach

Spinach

7. Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

For more information about Kidney Disease and Prevention, visit the National Kidney Foundation.

Information obtained and adapted from the following source: 7 Kidney-Friendly Superfoods.

This article offers general health information. Consult with your doctor, dietitian or other healthcare practitioner before you make changes to your daily diet.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

 

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | September 22, 2014

International Ataxia Awareness Day

 IAAD

September 25

“International Ataxia Awareness Day” is an international effort from ataxia organizations around the world to dedicate September 25 as International Ataxia Awareness Day. Although each participating country, state, or individual may have a specific plan for this event, the main focus is to raise awareness about Ataxia and to help fund research to stamp out this disorder.

Creating Ataxia Awareness

The goal of IAAD is for every individual to participate in some activity, creating awareness about ataxia. You could share something you know about ataxia with one other person who has never heard of it, educate a group of people by speaking at a school or civic group, contact the media, raise financial support or write about it on a blog and sharing awareness with you. That is what I am chosing to do. My daughter suffers from a form of ataxia called Ataxia with Oculormotor Apraxia Type II (AOA2).

What is Ataxia?

The word “ataxia”, comes from the Greek word, ” a taxis” meaning “without order or incoordination”. The word ataxia means without coordination. People with ataxia have problems with coordination because parts of the nervous system that control movement and balance are affected. Ataxia may affect

  • fingers
  • hands
  • arms
  • legs
  • body
  • speech
  • eye movements
  • all of the above.

The word ataxia is often used to describe a symptom of incoordination which can be associated with infections, injuries, other diseases, or degenerative changes in the central nervous system. Ataxia is also used to denote a group of specific degenerative diseases of the nervous system called the hereditary and sporadic ataxias which are the National Ataxia Foundation’s primary emphases.

What are Common Symptoms?

Typically balance and coordination are affected first. Coordination of hands, arms, and legs, and slurring of speech are other common symptoms. Walking becomes difficult and is characterized by walking with feet placed further apart to compensate for poor balance. Impaired coordination of the arms and hands affect a person’s ability to perform tasks requiring fine motor control such as writing and eating. Slow eye movements can be seen in some form of ataxia. As time goes on, ataxia can affect speech and swallowing.

The hereditary ataxias are degenerative disorders that progress over a number of years. How severe the disability will become and whether the disease will lead to death depends on type of ataxia, the age of onset of symptoms and other factors that are poorly understood at this time. Respiratory complications can be fatal in a person who is bed bound or who has severe swallowing problems. Some persons with Friedreich’s ataxia develop serious cardiac problems.

ataxia

International Ataxia Awareness Day has grown over the years and now includes events that are spread out through the month of September. The increased awareness and support is a step in the right direction to hopefully making Ataxia a thing of the past. It may not happen in my lifetime but we can hope that in my daughter’s or grandson’s, there will be a cure found! You can view the Ataxia Presentation to find out more.

Information obtained and adapted from the following source: National Ataxia Foundation

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | September 19, 2014

What Does WATR Offer?

Previous posts have hopefully made you familiar with Wyoming Assistive Technology Resources (WATR) as well as services and information provided by Wyoming Institute for Disabilities (WIND). They always have interesting and functional information to share but please take a closer look at all they have to offer by visiting their page and reading their latest publication, Wyoming Accessibility Center DispATch which can be found by clicking on this link: September 2014 Dispatch

September WATR info

 Information obtained and adapted from the following sources:

WATR logo            WIND

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | September 12, 2014

Sheridan Caregivers Conference

The Sheridan Senior Center, AARP and the University of Wyoming Center on Aging would like to invite you to a FREE caregivers conference in Sheridan, Wyoming on October 3rd and 4th.

Sheridan Caregivers Conference

There will be general information and sessions focused on Alzheimer’s Disease.

Respite care will be available during the event at the Sheridan Senior Center.

For more information follow this link, email wycoa@uwyo.edu or call 307-766-2829.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | September 6, 2014

Who’s Taking Care of You?

UW Aging

Coping with Caregiving

This FREE class for those caring for persons with dementia is presented by the University of Wyoming, Wyoming Center on Aging

When you are busy caring for the person with dementia, who’s taking care of you?

This program provides caregivers with specialized, small class training that allows them to be more effective caregivers. Program faculty work to find workable solutions for such problems as caregiver stress, challenging behaviors, home safety, self-care and social support using evidence based practice (EBP) or a practice that refer to the use of research and scientific studies as a base for determining the best practices in the field.

*Please plan to attend all classes.  Snacks and refreshments will be provided.

Thursdays, 1-3pm: 

September 18, 25,

October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30,

November 13, 20

December 4

At the Wyoming Technology Business Center
1938 Harney, Laramie, WY in Conference Room 104
 

For more information or to register please visit www.uwyo.edu/wycoa, email wycoa@uwyo.edu, or call (307) 766-2829

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | September 4, 2014

Living with Chronic Illness Workshop

Living with Chronic Illness: More Life, Less Limits

The  Arthritis Foundation is sponsoring this workshop in Cody, Wyoming on Thursday, October 2. Scheduled speakers include Amber Wolfe, National AgrAbility Project, Randy Weigel with the University of Wyoming and Ashlee Lundvall, Ms. Wheelchair USA, among others.

This is a free workshop but registration is required and can be done online.

Cody Ed Forum_FLYER

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | August 17, 2014

RightRisk News

RightRisk, risk management education products developed by the RightRisk Education Team. RightRisk is an innovative risk research and education effort to help farmers or ranchers understand and explore risk management decisions and evaluate the effects of those decisions.
 

Agricultural Act of 2014 – Supplemental Coverage Option (SCO)

The Agricultural Act of 2014 establishes SCO as an endorsement that attaches to and is made part of your common crop insurance policy. SCO mimics the coverage offered by your individual crop insurance plan to provide coverage for a portion of your insurance deductible using county-wide yield data when it is available…

Risk Management Profile

Art Fillizar and his wife Leinani Aku own and operate Fillizar Ranches. They have always been a cow-calf operation, marketing their beef mostly through local markets. Keeping the ranch in the black is increasingly difficult with recent droughts and increasing input costs…

To read more on these topics, read their August 2014 issue of RightRisk News.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

 

 

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | August 13, 2014

SAREC Open House & Field Day

Sustainable Agriculture Research & Extension Center, (SAREC) Open House & Field Day will take place on Thursday, August 21, 2014 in Lingle, Wyoming.

SAREC_2

Click here for more information.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

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