Posted by: Patricia Hysong | December 15, 2014

Holiday Eating

Snacks prepared

Traditionally the time frame from mid November to January 1st is very difficult for most folks who struggle with their weight and health issues caused by weight gain. Not only is there an abundance of food and drink but the holidays, despite the appearance of happiness and merriment, can be the cause of large amounts of stress. For many, food is the go to stress reliever, at least temporarily. There is a relief associated with eating but invariably, the stress comes back and then the cycle starts again. Not only that but on top of the original stress, there can be guilt about eating because of stress levels and so that adds more stress. It can be a vicious cycle and very hard to get out of.

If you stress eat or just want to try and keep weight gain in check of the holidays, try some of these to help you make better food\eating choices:

  • Skip the candy and crunch on some veggies.
  • Challenge yourself to try new vegetables and fruits that are out of the norm for you. By purchasing only a small amount, it’s a relatively inexpensive way to possibly find a new favorite snack item that could have many beneficial effects on your mind and body.
  • Retry some of those veggies and/or fruits you tried as a kid and did not like. Our taste buds change over the years and you may find you like them now.
  • Don’t buy the bad stuff to begin with.
  • Prepare shopping lists to keep yourself on track at the grocery store.
  • Don’t shop hungry. Eat before you go.
  • Stock your cupboards or pantry with healthier alternatives and buy with portion control in mind. Get smaller packages or portion out bigger packages into smaller ones so they are ready to go when you are ready to eat.
  • Eat slowly and taste what you are eating. You’ll eat less, taste more and enjoy what you have eaten.
  • Drink plenty of water-it’s good for you and makes you feel fuller.
  • Keep gum on hand to curb those cravings.
  • Plan and prepare-especially what’s for lunch and dinner in advance so you aren’t standing with the fridge door open and grabbing whatever is there. Planning also allows you to contemplate how great that meal will be when you got home and how much you will enjoy it.
  • Don’t starve yourself. Eat healthy snacks throughout the day so you are less tempted to overeat at meal time.
  • Give yourself permission to have small treats once in a while.
  • Don’t restrict yourself so much that it’s no fun and you rebel by eating everything.
  • If parties or potlucks are the problem: Eat healthy before you go, make and take a healthy alternative for everyone there, take tastes, not gobs and ask yourself whether what you are eating is worth the consequences both mentally and physically.
  • Find one small thing to work on and change it. Sometimes the “big picture” is like an elephant on your chest and causes more problems. Make smaller, more manageable changes to start with.
  • When you experience setbacks, remind yourself that everyday is a new day and a new start.
  • Keep in mind that where you are today did not happen overnight and where you want to be will take time as well.
  • The journey will have ups and downs, but you can do this and if you need help, ask for it. Talk with your healthcare provider and discuss options available to you for your personal situation.
  • Being perfect isn’t all it’s cracked up to be-everyone is allowed mistakes, just learn from them.

Snacks Prepared 2

These ideas are appropriate year round so you may consider incorporating them into New Year’s Resolutions if you are so inclined.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

 

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | December 8, 2014

Livestock vs. Wildlife Grazing

Check out this University of Wyoming Extension bulletin that breaks down livestock vs. wildlife grazing competition.

http://www.wyoextension.org/agpubs/pubs/B-1260.pdf

Information courtesy of University of Wyoming Extension.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 30, 2014

World Aids Day

world_logo2

 

December 1, 2014 is designated as World Aids Day.

Around the world, about 34 million people are living with HIV. In the United States, about 50,000 people get infected with HIV every year. World AIDS Day is a global initiative to raise awareness, fight prejudice, and improve education about HIV and AIDS.

How can World AIDS Day make a difference?

We can use this day to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS, encourage people to get tested, and take action to support people living with HIV.

Here are just a few ideas:

  • Encourage people to get tested for HIV. Let them know that some health clinics offer free HIV testing.
  • Talk to parents about teaching their kids the basics of safe sex.
  • Wear a red ribbon, the symbol of HIV awareness and support. Tell people why you are wearing it.

Information obtained and or adapted from Healthfinder.gov.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 27, 2014

Happy Thanksgiving!

There are claims that the first Thanksgiving Day was held in the city of El Paso, Texas in 1598. Another early event was held in 1619 in the Virginia Colony. Many people trace the origins of the modern Thanksgiving Day to the harvest celebration that the Pilgrims held in Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621. However, their first true thanksgiving was in 1623, when they gave thanks for rain that ended a drought. These early thanksgivings took the form of a special church service, rather than a feast.

In the second half of the 1600s, thanksgivings after the harvest became more common and started to become annual events. However, it was celebrated on different days in different communities and in some places there were more than one thanksgiving each year. George Washington, the first president of the United States, proclaimed the first national Thanksgiving Day in 1789. It has been an annual holiday in the United States since 1863.

 

Information from Thanksgiving Day in the United States.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

 

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 20, 2014

Symptoms of the Flu

As the weather begins to change and we finally start feeling the effects of Old Man Winter, we also may begin to feel the effects of the dreaded influenza. Higher risk groups for catching the flu are pregnant women, those over 65, young children,  and those with compromised immune systems such as those undergoing cancer treatments, steroid treatments or transplant recipients.

Flu Facts

Flu symptoms can be mild or severe and typically come on very suddenly. They usually appear 1 to 4 days after exposure to the virus. They can include but are not limited to the following and come in varying degrees of severity.

  • Fever of 100 or higher (not all those with influenza have a fever!)
  • Headache and\or Muscle\Body aches
  • Chills
  • Tiredness
  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Sudden onset
  • Sore throat
  • Runny nose (more so in children than adults)
  • Stuffy nose
  • Diarrhea and vomiting (not as common as the other symptoms)

If you are experiencing several or all of these symptoms, consult with your health care provider for verification and to see what your treatment options are.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 13, 2014

Tips for Avoiding the Flu

The dreaded Influenza!

migraine

The flu is a serious, contagious virus that is believed to mainly be spread by droplets from the talking, sneezing and coughing of those who have the flu that land in the mouth or noses of people who happen to be near them. It may be possible that those droplets can be inhaled into the lungs as well. It can also be spread by touching infected surfaces or objects and then touching ones own eyes, mouth or nose. Infected persons may be able to spread the virus from 1 day prior to showing symptoms up to 5-7 days after being sick and even longer in some people including children and those with lowered immune systems.

Each flu season, different strains of the virus spread and effect people differently based on that persons ability to fight off they virus. Here are a few tips that may help you avoid getting the flu.

  • Get Vaccinated. Vaccines are available that protects against the 3 most common viruses. The more people that get vaccinated, the fewer people will get sick and fewer communities are likely to experience flu epidemics.
  • Use common, everyday actions such as covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you sneeze, wash hands with soap and water, try not to touch communal surfaces, avoid touching your face, give sick people their space, and stay home if you are sick.
  • Keep hydrated and eat healthy. This keeps your immune system strong.
  • Be physically active. Again, being active and fit increases the strength of your immune system and helps to keep you healthy.
  • Consult your health care provider and ask what you can do to prevent getting sick and see what medications are available if you have not been vaccinated and the flu is spreading through your community.
  • If you do get the flu, there are antiviral medications that can help lessen the symptoms and duration of the disease. Seek medical advice immediately because they work best in the first 2 days of you showing symptoms.

Information adapted from the National Kidney Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control.

 

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 11, 2014

Forever Grateful!

DSC01957

We salute the courageous and honorable veterans of the armed forces who have served and\or are currently serving. Your willingness to serve and the sacrifices you have endured are appreciated and will not be forgotten.

DSC01966a

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 9, 2014

A Reminder: Veterans Day vs. Memorial Day

Veterans Day 2013b

What is the difference between Veterans Day and Memorial Day?

Many people confuse Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Memorial Day is a day for remembering and honoring military personnel who died in the service of their country, particularly those who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained in battle. While those who died are also remembered, Veterans Day is the day set aside to thank and honor ALL those who served honorably in the military – in wartime or peacetime. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank LIVING veterans for their service, to acknowledge that their contributions to our national security are appreciated, and to underscore the fact that all those who served – not only those who died – have sacrificed and done their duty.

Visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs website for more questions and answers about Veterans Day.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 5, 2014

Want Information About Assistive Technology?

Want or need information about assistive technology, WATR and WIND are excited about their new open lab hours.

WATR open lab hours

For questions, contact WATR at watr@uwyo.edu | (307) 766-6187. 

Check it out!

Information adapted from Wyoming Assistive Technology Resources (WATR)  and Wyoming Institute for Disabilities (WIND).

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 3, 2014

Laramie, Today

Old Man Winter is knocking at our door.

This is what the view is from my window today.

Nov 3, 2014

Thankfully we have had a wonderful, mild, fall.

That appears to be at an end…for a few days at least.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 163 other followers

%d bloggers like this: