Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 20, 2014

Symptoms of the Flu

As the weather begins to change and we finally start feeling the effects of Old Man Winter, we also may begin to feel the effects of the dreaded influenza. Higher risk groups for catching the flu are pregnant women, those over 65, young children,  and those with compromised immune systems such as those undergoing cancer treatments, steroid treatments or transplant recipients.

Flu Facts

Flu symptoms can be mild or severe and typically come on very suddenly. They usually appear 1 to 4 days after exposure to the virus. They can include but are not limited to the following and come in varying degrees of severity.

  • Fever of 100 or higher (not all those with influenza have a fever!)
  • Headache and\or Muscle\Body aches
  • Chills
  • Tiredness
  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Sudden onset
  • Sore throat
  • Runny nose (more so in children than adults)
  • Stuffy nose
  • Diarrhea and vomiting (not as common as the other symptoms)

If you are experiencing several or all of these symptoms, consult with your health care provider for verification and to see what your treatment options are.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 13, 2014

Tips for Avoiding the Flu

The dreaded Influenza!

migraine

The flu is a serious, contagious virus that is believed to mainly be spread by droplets from the talking, sneezing and coughing of those who have the flu that land in the mouth or noses of people who happen to be near them. It may be possible that those droplets can be inhaled into the lungs as well. It can also be spread by touching infected surfaces or objects and then touching ones own eyes, mouth or nose. Infected persons may be able to spread the virus from 1 day prior to showing symptoms up to 5-7 days after being sick and even longer in some people including children and those with lowered immune systems.

Each flu season, different strains of the virus spread and effect people differently based on that persons ability to fight off they virus. Here are a few tips that may help you avoid getting the flu.

  • Get Vaccinated. Vaccines are available that protects against the 3 most common viruses. The more people that get vaccinated, the fewer people will get sick and fewer communities are likely to experience flu epidemics.
  • Use common, everyday actions such as covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you sneeze, wash hands with soap and water, try not to touch communal surfaces, avoid touching your face, give sick people their space, and stay home if you are sick.
  • Keep hydrated and eat healthy. This keeps your immune system strong.
  • Be physically active. Again, being active and fit increases the strength of your immune system and helps to keep you healthy.
  • Consult your health care provider and ask what you can do to prevent getting sick and see what medications are available if you have not been vaccinated and the flu is spreading through your community.
  • If you do get the flu, there are antiviral medications that can help lessen the symptoms and duration of the disease. Seek medical advice immediately because they work best in the first 2 days of you showing symptoms.

Information adapted from the National Kidney Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control.

 

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 11, 2014

Forever Grateful!

DSC01957

We salute the courageous and honorable veterans of the armed forces who have served and\or are currently serving. Your willingness to serve and the sacrifices you have endured are appreciated and will not be forgotten.

DSC01966a

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 9, 2014

A Reminder: Veterans Day vs. Memorial Day

Veterans Day 2013b

What is the difference between Veterans Day and Memorial Day?

Many people confuse Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Memorial Day is a day for remembering and honoring military personnel who died in the service of their country, particularly those who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained in battle. While those who died are also remembered, Veterans Day is the day set aside to thank and honor ALL those who served honorably in the military – in wartime or peacetime. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank LIVING veterans for their service, to acknowledge that their contributions to our national security are appreciated, and to underscore the fact that all those who served – not only those who died – have sacrificed and done their duty.

Visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs website for more questions and answers about Veterans Day.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 5, 2014

Want Information About Assistive Technology?

Want or need information about assistive technology, WATR and WIND are excited about their new open lab hours.

WATR open lab hours

For questions, contact WATR at watr@uwyo.edu | (307) 766-6187. 

Check it out!

Information adapted from Wyoming Assistive Technology Resources (WATR)  and Wyoming Institute for Disabilities (WIND).

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 3, 2014

Laramie, Today

Old Man Winter is knocking at our door.

This is what the view is from my window today.

Nov 3, 2014

Thankfully we have had a wonderful, mild, fall.

That appears to be at an end…for a few days at least.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | November 1, 2014

Our Changing Times

Don’t forget to set your clocks back one hour on Saturday night before retiring to bed.

Watch1

November 2, 2014 marks the end of Daylight Savings for 2014. President Lyndon Johnson signed the Uniform Time Act into law in 1966. Currently in the United States of America, only Hawaii and Arizona do not observe the annual ritual of changing our clocks ahead one hour in spring and back one hour in fall. There are other states that have recently introduced bills that would also allow their states follow Arizona and Hawaii’s example but those outcomes are still undetermined. Among the reasons listed for discontinuing this practice are safety for children being out and about while it is still so dark in the mornings, the simple fact that people don’t like changing their clocks twice a year, and that the original intended effect of saving energy by changing the clocks is so minimal that it is not worth it.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | October 31, 2014

Happy Halloween

Pumkin

 This post is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | October 27, 2014

Halloween Safety

halloween

 

Halloween is less than a week away and we all know what that means. Candy, costumes, candy, children’s events, candy, adult parties, candy, and well, you get it. The one thing that isn’t mentioned as often is the importance of keeping our children safe while they are out enjoying the festivities and as adults, keeping our heads in the midst of the crowds of people and all the excess energy produced by all the sugar our children have ingested. Not to mention the other side effects all those artificial ingredients produce in our otherwise perfectly behaved children.

Our community seems to have made Halloween a week long event over the last few years with events nearly every day. While the upside to this is that the children, and lets face it, the adults, get to wear those costumes they may have paid upwards of $50.00 for more than once, it can seem like we’re running around like chickens without heads trying to fit everything in. In the rush, keeping safety in mind is key to fun and sanity.

When making your costume choices:

  • costumes, wigs and accessories should be fire-resistant
  • make sure they can be seen by using reflective tape on costumes and treat bags
  • use non-toxic makeup and test before the big night to make sure there is no irritation
  • remove all makeup before bedtime
  • masks can limit vision so consider alternatives such as makeup and\or hats
  • if masks are worn, make sure eye, nose and mouth openings are sufficiently large enough to allow for comfort,  visual range, breathing and speaking
  • make sure the costume fits well to avoid trips and falls
  • accessories such as knives, swords, wands and other sharp object should be made of flexible materials
  • serious eye injuries have occurred with the use of decorative contact, don’t use them

If you are driving on Halloween keep all eyes peeled for children, pets, and creatures of the night:

  • darting out from parked cars
  • getting in and out of vehicles that have parked haphazardly in the street
  • walking everywhere but the sidewalks
  • when entering and exiting driveways and alleys
  • that are wearing dark clothing

Go over important rules with your goblins and ghouls before they go out:

  • go only to areas and houses they are familiar with and make sure they let you know the general area they will be trick or treating in
  • don’t eat treats until you have had the chance to go through them
  • never enter the house of anyone they don’t know
  • give them a set time to be home and stick to it
  • make sure they are prepared with a flashlight with fresh batteries, costumes that are light in color or have reflective tape attached, and a cell phone
  • review pedestrian and traffic rules

Halloween can be such a great time but it is important that everyone keep safety in mind:

  • never use your cell phone while driving
  • never text and drive
  • discourage inexperienced drivers from driving on Halloween
  • all children under 12 should be accompanied by a parent or responsible adult
  • parents and responsible adults need to set good examples for their little monsters, princesses, turtles and clowns and follow traffic, pedestrian and safety rules

Keep these thing in mind and may your Halloween be spooky, scary, creepy, stress free, fun, and SAFE!

Some information obtained and adapted from the following source: The National Safety Council

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | October 24, 2014

Specialty Crops Workshop

Specialty Crop Workshop

Topics include growing berries- (raspberries, black berries, strawberries), grapes, hops, guar, proso millet, native grasses and seeds, markets, marketing and more!  Registration limited to 60 people. Cost: $50.00 Registration deadline Oct. 27, 2014

Oct. 31st 9:00 am—5:00 pm

Nov. 1st 9:00 am—4:00 pm

Platte County Public Library 904 9th St Wheatland, WY

Brochure and registration form  http://www.uwyo.edu/barnbackyard/_files/documents/events/2014/specialtycropworkshop.pdf

For more information contact LeRoy Jons at cjons2@uwyo.edu or the Platte County UW Extension office at 307-322-3667

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 162 other followers

%d bloggers like this: