Posted by: Patricia Hysong | February 15, 2015

Wyoming ADA Resources

Are you or someone you know in need information for and resources available to Wyoming residents with a disability?

If so, start with your health care provider. They may be able to get you started with information as to what is available in your area as well as at a state level. A good health care\medical provider should have the information you need to put you on the path of finding out what services and resources are available and how to contact others that will have more information.

Another place to begin is Wyoming Department of Workforce Services. Within the Department of Workforce Services, you will find information about disability determination services as well as vocational rehabilitation locations and offices. The Social Security Disability Determination Services and Wyoming Vocational Rehabilitation websites may answer a lot of questions and will provide you more points of contact if you need to pursue getting more information and resources. You can also contact your local Workforce Services office for more individual assistance.

The Rocky Mountain ADA Center has information on Wyoming resources as well as for five other Rocky Mountain states. You can also find information regarding services for regions outside the Rocky Mountain area.

The Americans with Disabilities Act federal regulations can be found at ADA.gov.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | February 11, 2015

Happy Valentine’s Day

Valentine

St. Valentine’s Day historical information can be found at History.com.

 

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | February 3, 2015

National Wear Red Day-February 6, 2015

Wear Red

February 6, 2015 is National Wear Red Day.®  This annual event is to help promote and show support for women’s heart health. It provides an opportunity for everyone to come together by wearing anything and everything red to focus attention on this important cause.

This information is adapted from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

®National Wear Red Day is a registered trademark of HHS and AHA.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | January 28, 2015

2nd Annual WY-NE Organic Farming Conference

Are you farming organically or do you want to be? Would you like more information about reducing inputs for sustainable farming? Consider attending the 2nd Annual Wyoming-Nebraska Organic Farming Conference, February 11, 2015 in Torrington, Wyoming.

WY-NE Organic Conference Flyer

Registration and information can be found here.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | January 21, 2015

National Thyroid Awareness Month

 January is National Thyroid Awareness Month.

                      THYROID_72                                    (Photo Courtesy of WebMD) 
What is the Thyroid?

The Thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland, low on the front of the neck, below the Adam’s apple in front of the windpipe.

What does it do in the body?

The Thyroid Gland secretes thyroid hormones that act throughout the body to help it regulate metabolism and influence growth, development and body temperature.

Why is it important?

The Thyroid affects your metabolism rate, regulating how fast or slow your brain, heart, liver, kidneys and other parts of your body work. It plays a role in the function of many of the body’s most important organs. Having the correct amounts of thyroid hormone is crucial for brain development in infancy and childhood.

What are some  Thyroid diseases\disorders?

Thyroid disorders can range from a small, harmless goiter (enlarged gland) that needs no treatment to life-threatening cancer. The most common thyroid problems involve abnormal production of thyroid hormones. Too much thyroid hormone results in a condition known as hyperthyroidism. Insufficient hormone production leads to hypothyroidism.

Causes of Hyperthyroidism include Graves’ disease, toxic adenomas, subacute thyroiditis, pituitary gland malfunctions or cancerous growths in the thyroid gland.

Causes of Hypothyroidism include Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, removal of the thyroid gland, exposure to excessive amounts of iodide or lithium.

How do I get my Thyroid tested?

Thyroid levels are tested through blood tests. Blood test assess the function of the thyroid by measuring Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid hormone levels and by detecting autoantibodies present in autoimmune thyroid disease. The TSH test checks how well the thyroid is working. The T4 and T3 tests measure the amount of those hormones in the blood. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) test detects the amount of TSI circulating in the blood and is usually measured in people with Graves’ disease, during pregnancy or to see if a person is in remission or no longer has hyperthyroidism and its symptoms.

For more information on common thyroid disorders, visit Healthline.

Other information adapted from and for more information, visit WebMD.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | January 13, 2015

Laramie Happenings

Native Plants in the Landscape – from seeds to the garden

January 14, 6:30-8:00 pm, Albany County Fairgrounds, Extension Meeting Room, Laramie

Session discussion will cover collecting native seeds, getting a jump on the gardening season by starting plants from seeds indoors and growing these native herbaceous perennials in the landscape.  Subjects and plants covered will vary according to the interests of those attending the session.   This is part of a horticulture information series starting in January 2015.  The series is free to attend. Please RSVP to ensure we have enough seats available.   For more information or to RSVP, contact Kellie Chichester at 307-721-2571 or kelliec@uwyo.edu.

Cattle Health Seminar

January 21, 5:30 pm, Albany County Fairgrounds, Extension Meeting Room, Laramie      

Topics to be covered include: Problem solving approaches to cattle diseases, diagnostics, respiratory, pinkeye, Spring deworming and long acting parasite control. This seminar is sponsored by Merial, Newport Laboratories and Albany County Extension.  Dinner provided, please RSVP by January 16, 2015. For more information or to RSVP, contact Kellie Chichester at 307-721-2571 or kelliec@uwyo.edu.

Water Conservation in Plants and Gardens

January 27, 7:00 pm, United Presbyterian Church, 215 South 11th, Laramie 

Water bill looking scary?  Join Chris Hilgert, Wyoming Master Gardener Program Coordinator, to find out how you can make every last drop count.  A Laramie Garden Club meeting will follow.

Bees-Honey and Native

January 28, 6:30-8:00 pm  Albany County Fairgrounds, Extension Meeting Room, Laramie

Are you interested in “saving the bees”? Beekeeper and Master Gardener, Rene Sollars will talk about getting started with honey bees as well as promoting native bees. There will be beekeeping equipment on hand for viewing and questions as well as information about promoting native bees in our landscape. Part of a horticulture information series starting in January 2015.  The series is free to attend. Please RSVP to ensure we have enough seats available.   For more information or to RSVP, contact Kellie Chichester at 307-721-2571 or kelliec@uwyo.edu.

More events at http://www.uwyo.edu/barnbackyard/events/index.html

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | January 7, 2015

Expectations – Think Ability!

The Parent Information Center (PIC) 2015 Parent Conference on Disabilities entitled “Expectations – Think Abilitiy!” will be held in Casper, Wyoming on January 17th and 18th at the Parkway Plaza.

Registration Costs: No registration costs for parents of children with disabilities – parent stipend to defray travel expenses of $50 – $100 per family available on a first come / first serve basis. Call PIC at 307-684-2277  for details; Educators and service providers $50 each.

Conference Topics Include: Challenging Behaviors, Conflict Resolution, Learning Disabilities, Sensory Disorder, Transition to Employment and more!

For more information, visit the Parent Information Center website.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | January 1, 2015

2015!

2014 HNY_2

 

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | December 25, 2014

Happy Holidays to All

2013 Season's Greeting

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | December 15, 2014

Holiday Eating

Snacks prepared

Traditionally the time frame from mid November to January 1st is very difficult for most folks who struggle with their weight and health issues caused by weight gain. Not only is there an abundance of food and drink but the holidays, despite the appearance of happiness and merriment, can be the cause of large amounts of stress. For many, food is the go to stress reliever, at least temporarily. There is a relief associated with eating but invariably, the stress comes back and then the cycle starts again. Not only that but on top of the original stress, there can be guilt about eating because of stress levels and so that adds more stress. It can be a vicious cycle and very hard to get out of.

If you stress eat or just want to try and keep weight gain in check of the holidays, try some of these to help you make better food\eating choices:

  • Skip the candy and crunch on some veggies.
  • Challenge yourself to try new vegetables and fruits that are out of the norm for you. By purchasing only a small amount, it’s a relatively inexpensive way to possibly find a new favorite snack item that could have many beneficial effects on your mind and body.
  • Retry some of those veggies and/or fruits you tried as a kid and did not like. Our taste buds change over the years and you may find you like them now.
  • Don’t buy the bad stuff to begin with.
  • Prepare shopping lists to keep yourself on track at the grocery store.
  • Don’t shop hungry. Eat before you go.
  • Stock your cupboards or pantry with healthier alternatives and buy with portion control in mind. Get smaller packages or portion out bigger packages into smaller ones so they are ready to go when you are ready to eat.
  • Eat slowly and taste what you are eating. You’ll eat less, taste more and enjoy what you have eaten.
  • Drink plenty of water-it’s good for you and makes you feel fuller.
  • Keep gum on hand to curb those cravings.
  • Plan and prepare-especially what’s for lunch and dinner in advance so you aren’t standing with the fridge door open and grabbing whatever is there. Planning also allows you to contemplate how great that meal will be when you got home and how much you will enjoy it.
  • Don’t starve yourself. Eat healthy snacks throughout the day so you are less tempted to overeat at meal time.
  • Give yourself permission to have small treats once in a while.
  • Don’t restrict yourself so much that it’s no fun and you rebel by eating everything.
  • If parties or potlucks are the problem: Eat healthy before you go, make and take a healthy alternative for everyone there, take tastes, not gobs and ask yourself whether what you are eating is worth the consequences both mentally and physically.
  • Find one small thing to work on and change it. Sometimes the “big picture” is like an elephant on your chest and causes more problems. Make smaller, more manageable changes to start with.
  • When you experience setbacks, remind yourself that everyday is a new day and a new start.
  • Keep in mind that where you are today did not happen overnight and where you want to be will take time as well.
  • The journey will have ups and downs, but you can do this and if you need help, ask for it. Talk with your healthcare provider and discuss options available to you for your personal situation.
  • Being perfect isn’t all it’s cracked up to be-everyone is allowed mistakes, just learn from them.

Snacks Prepared 2

These ideas are appropriate year round so you may consider incorporating them into New Year’s Resolutions if you are so inclined.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

 

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