Posted by: Patricia Hysong | July 5, 2015

Another Plant Walk Scheduled

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There will be another Laramie Area Plant Walk taking place July 18, 2015 at the Pelton Creek area in the Snowy Range. The walk begins at 9:30 and will wrap up by noon. Register at http://peltoncreekplantwalk.eventbrite.com  or call the Albany Co UW Extension office at 307-721-2571.

Pelton Creek area Plant Walk

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | July 1, 2015

Fireworks and Safety

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Although July is Fireworks Safety Month, The National Council of Fireworks Safety promotes safe and responsible use of consumer fireworks and wants everyone to get the message out about safe practices in the use of fireworks year around.

Preventing injury is the goal in their efforts to educate the public on how to use fireworks safely and responsibly. In 2013, there were eight deaths and an estimated 11,400 fireworks related injuries.  All of the 2013 fireworks related fatalities were caused by fireworks that were banned, professional or home-manufactured devices according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

Fireworks can do damage physically, emotionally and environmentally. They can even be deadly, but following these safety tips can make the experience far less dangerous and much more fun for all those involved.

  • know local laws and follow them
  • read the cautionary labels and performance descriptions before igniting
  • responsible adults SHOULD supervise all firework activities. Never give fireworks to children
  • alcohol and fireworks do not mix
  • wear safety glasses when shooting fireworks
  • light one firework at a time and then quickly move away
  • use fireworks OUTDOORS in a clear area; away from buildings and vehicles
  • never relight a “dud” firework. Wait 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water
  • always have a bucket of water and charged water hose nearby
  • never carry fireworks in your POCKET or shoot them into METAL or GLASS containers
  • do not experiment with homemade fireworks
  • dispose of spent fireworks by wetting them down and place in a metal trash can away from any building or combustible materials
  • report illegal explosives, like M-80s and quarter sticks, to the fire or police department.

It is the consumer’s responsibility to know the laws within the state they are purchasing fireworks in and remember just because they are legal to purchase and shoot off in one state, does not mean they are in the next. In all actuality, the ability to discharge fireworks can and does vary from county to county and town to town. Depending on the area and local regulations, there could be fireworks bans in one county and not the next. It is the responsibility and duty of the individual consumer to know all the laws regarding use of fireworks and check with the appointing authority in their chosen area before setting them off.

Beyond the safety issues and the responsibilities of those using fireworks, no matter the time of year or holiday, please also take into account those around you and your chosen site to shoot off the fireworks. As mentioned above, always know where it is legal and safe to discharge fireworks, but also consider those in the area. Many pets have anxiety and do not do well with the loud noises and flashes of light that come along with the beauty of fireworks. In addition, some people have adverse reactions to the same things. Be considerate and let folks around you know when and where you are planning to set them off so accommodations can be made to make it a better experience for those that don’t enjoy fireworks.

Information obtained and adapted from National Council on Fireworks Safety, the APA (American Pyrotechnics Association), and the CPSC.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | June 27, 2015

Wyoming Assistive Technology Resources (WATR)

The Wyoming Assistive Technology Resources (WATR) through the Wyoming Institute for Disabilities (WIND) announces it’s July and August Open Lab Schedule.

WATR Logo

WATR is Wyoming’s Assistive Technology Act program and a resource for all assistive technology (AT) needs in Wyoming. AT may be a device or solution that enhances an individual’s ability to live, play, or work independently. AT can take the form of a device, tool, or adaptation that supports a person when participating in everyday activities and settings.

WIND Logo

WIND works to assist individuals with developmental disabilities, their families, professionals, and University of Wyoming students through education, training, community services, and early intervention.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | June 20, 2015

Scleroderma Month

What is Scleroderma?

Scleroderma is a chronic connective tissue disease classified as one of the autoimmune rheumatic diseases.  The word “scleroderma” comes from the Greek “sclero” meaning hard and “derma” meaning skin. Hardening of the skin is only one of the most visible manifestations and one of the many symptoms suffered by those affected by scleroderma. There could also be stiff joints, digestive issues, lung scarring, kidney failure and it can be fatal. The disease varies from patient-to-patient and can be mild to life threatening. There is no known cause or cure but it is known that scleroderma involves an over production of collagen. Early treatment is critical because without treatment a mild case can become more serious if not properly treated. Diagnosis may be difficult because scleroderma presents with symptoms very like those of other autoimmune disorders. Onset can occur at any age, but typically it is between the ages of 25 to 55. It appears in males and females but women are far more likely to be affected than men at a ratio of about 4:1.

Information adapted from Scleroderma Foundation and the Scleroderma Research Foundation. Please visit these sights for more information.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | June 13, 2015

June 1, 2015 SAREC in Pictures

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SAREC in pictures-6-1-15_Page_2

To view as a pdf, click here: SAREC in pictures-6-1-15.

For more information, visit their website or Facebook page http://www.uwyo.edu/uwexpstn/centers/sarec/index.html or https://www.facebook.com/UWSAREC

 

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | June 6, 2015

Laramie Area Plant Walk

 

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Register by June 18th at http://curtgowdyplantwalk.eventbrite.com  or

call the Albany Co UW Extension office at 307-721-2571.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | May 27, 2015

Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection & Prevention

In addition to May being National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, it is also Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month.

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Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun is the main cause of skin cancer, but it can also come from tanning booths or sunlamps. Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and although it accounts for less than 2% of skin cancer cases, a large majority of skin cancer deaths are melanomas. It is estimated that about 74,000 new cases of melanomas will be diagnosed this year and nearly 10,000 deaths from melanoma are expected. The good news is that skin cancer can almost always be cured if detected and treated early. Knowing risk factors and prevention tools can drastically reduce your likelihood of getting any type of skin cancer.

UV Index

Risk Factors:

  • prolonged, unprotected exposure to UV rays~ UV rays damage the DNA of skin cells
  • moles~ non-cancerous (benign) pigmented tumors that usually do not ever cause cancer, but the more moles a person has the more likely they are to develop skin cancer
  • fair skin, freckling and light hair~ whites are at a higher risk for developing skin cancer and melanoma than those with darker complexions
  • family history~ approximately 10% of people with melanoma have a family history of the disease
  • previous diagnosis~ 5% of those who are diagnosed will develop it again
  • compromised immune system~ either from certain diseases or from medical treatments because their immune system is weakened
  • age~ although more likely to be found in older people, it is one of the most common cancers in people younger than 30
  • Gender~ typically men have a higher rate of melanoma than women, but that rate varies by age; men have a higher rate than women after the age of 45, women have a higher risk before the age of 45
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum(XP)~ rare, genetic condition affecting skin cells’ ability to repair damage to their DNA

Melanoma Prevention

Prevention:

  • slip on clothing to cover your skin
  • slop in the sunscreen
  • slap on a hat to protect your head, face, and ears
  • seek shade to avoid direct sunlight and UV rays
  • slide on sunglasses to protect your eyes and the delicate skin around them

Always, always, always, read the labels on sunscreen and sunglasses to make sure they are protecting you from UV rays and make sure to reapply sunscreen according to directions on the label. Never rely on just one form of protection. More is better!

Melanoma Self Exam

Early Detection:

  • self examination~ no x-rays needed, just your eyes and a mirror
  • dermatologist exam~ if you are at higher risk then consider consulting a dermatologist on a regular basis because they may be able to more easily recognize suspect abnormalities
  • question anything suspect~ consult your healthcare professional if you have questions or notice changes or abnormalities on your skin

Information adapted and obtained from the American Cancer Society.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | May 23, 2015

Memorial Day

Memorial Day is a federal holiday observed every year on the last Monday in May.

Memorial Day Flag

Memorial Day honors those who lost their lives while in the military service. It is traditional to fly the American flag at half mast. Many people visit national cemeteries where volunteers will place the American flag on each grave. Memorial Day originated after the American Civil War to honor both the Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the war. The holiday was extended by the 20th century to include all American soldiers. Memorial Day is formally known as Decoration Day. This day is not to be confused with Veteran’s Day which celebrates the service of all United States military veterans.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | May 20, 2015

$30 Million Available From USDA

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The United States Department of Agriculture is making $30 million available to food producers, ranchers, and farmers to develop new product lines though funding from the Value-Added Producer Grant (VAPG) program. The Value-Added Producer Grant program helps agricultural producers enter into value-added activities related to the processing and/or marketing of bio-based, value-added products. Generating new products, creating and expanding marketing opportunities, and increasing producer income are the goals of this program. Applications from independent producers, agricultural producer groups, cooperative framers or ranchers and majority-controlled producer-based business ventures will be accepted through July 2, 2015 for electronic entries and July 7, 2015 for paper applications.

For more information visit the USDA and Farmers Hotline websites.

You may also contact your local office for assistance.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

Posted by: Patricia Hysong | May 10, 2015

National Physical Fitness & Sports Month-May

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May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month.

Being active throughout your life leads to improved muscular fitness and good bone and heart health in children and adolescents, lower risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some types of cancer in adults and in older adults can lower risk of falls and improve cognitive function. Those are just a few of the benefits. Other benefits can include better health overall, stress relief, weight loss or maintenance, living longer, increased social interactions, increased flexibility, and being happier in general.

Being active is different for everyone. For some it’s an all or nothing workout that they have been doing for years. For others it could be an hour per day a couple of days a week at the gym, walking or running daily or several times a week. Others still may spend their active time playing with the kids or grandkids at the park, riding bikes or just getting out of the house for a walk once in a while. Of course, generally speaking, the more you do the better it is for your health, but any movement is better than none. Gardening, housework, laundry, strolling with a friend to the end of the block or better yet around it can be beneficial to those that have a shortage of time or a lack of inclination to do a more intense workout or exercise regimen.

Physical activity is for everyone, no matter what shape you are in, there are activities that can work for you and the more you do it, the easier it becomes. If you are currently not moving as much as you should be or at all, start slow. Consider small changes to begin with and encourage family and friends to join you. Ask them to go for a walk after dinner or for a bike ride. You could do simple stretches at home or get small weights or exercise bands if you aren’t able to get out. Start slow, don’t give up.

Are you a little more active? Try raising the bar a bit and doing something else in addition to you regular routine. Increase the pace or distance of your walk\run. Put on the music and dance, by yourself or with those that won’t laugh too hard at your “awesome” dance moves. Make plans and take the kids or grandkids to the pool. Adult recommendations for physical activities is moderate aerobic activity for 2 and 1/2 hours per week. Are you there yet?

As the adult, setting a good example for the children in your life helps to set them up for better health for life. Involve and include them in your activity. Invite them to participate and do things they enjoy doing as well. When we call activity play, it becomes fun. When we call it exercise, it becomes work.

As with any big lifestyle change, consult your physician if your health is not good before beginning any fitness plan.

This information is provided courtesy of the Wyoming AgrAbility Project. For more information, visit our website or call toll-free at 866-395-4986.

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